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Academic publications

Cultural Elements and Women Subservient Roles among Cocoa Farm Families in Southwest Nigeria: Implications for HIV Prevention Strategies., , and A. Lawal O. , IOSR Journal of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, 05/2014, Volume 7, Issue 5, Nigeria, (2014) , (Academic Publication)
RECONFIGURATION OF THE COCOA INDUSTRY AND POVERTY REDUCTION IN COTE D’IVOIRE, , 05/2014, Abidjan, (2014) , (Academic Publication)
Gender and Asset Ownership: Recent Agriculture Development Interventions in Africa , Ncube, Mthuli, and Lufumpa Charles Leyeka , Africa Economics & Financial Brief, 01/2014, Volume 5, Issue 1, (2014) , (Academic Publication)
Early Life Circumstance and Mental Health in Ghana, Adhvaryu, Achyuta, Fenske James, and Nyshadham Anant , CSAE (Centre for the study of African Economies) Working Paper WPS/2014-03, 01/2014, (2014) , (Academic Publication)
Social Innovation Among Ethnics in Cocoa Farming at Sulawesi, Indonesia , Fahmid, Imam Mujahidin , Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare , 11/2013, Volume Vol.3, Issue 15, (2013) , (Academic Publication)

Cultural Elements and Women Subservient Roles among Cocoa Farm Families in Southwest Nigeria: Implications for HIV Prevention Strategies.

TitleCultural Elements and Women Subservient Roles among Cocoa Farm Families in Southwest Nigeria: Implications for HIV Prevention Strategies.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
Authors, and A. Lawal O.
JournalIOSR Journal of Agriculture and Veterinary Science
Volume7
Issue5
Date Published05/2014
PublisherCocoa Research Institute of Nigeria
Place PublishedNigeria
Publication LanguageEnglish
KeywordsHIV, women
Lead

This paper investigated subservient roles and cultural elements that situate women in cocoa farm families in south-western Nigeria to HIV/AIDS. More importantly, women practice of some HIV/AIDS prevention strategies; abstinence, condom use, status check, safe sex, avoid untreated sharp objects avoid transfusion of untested blood and faithfulness were investigated. Multistage sampling procedure was used to select 120 respondents from which information were solicited using a pre-tested interview schedule. The study revealed a mean age of 41.2±11 years and 68.33% into polygamy, while 30% and 10% were 2nd and 3rd wife respectively in their families. It was also revealed that though respondents had high knowledge in the HIV prevention strategies; there were low scores in practice of the strategies. There was negative and significant relationship (r = -0.220; p< 0.05) between subservient roles performed and their practices of HIV/ AID prevention, while negative and significant relationship also existed between sexual servitude and practice of HIV prevention strategies at (r = -0.44; p<0.05).

URLhttp://iosrjournals.org/iosr-javs/papers/vol7-issue5/Version-3/C07531320.pdf

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