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Practical publications

Cocoa Production and Related Social-Economic and Climate Factors: A Case Study of Ayedire Local Government Area of Osun State, Nigeria, Adeniyi, O. R., and Ogunsola G.O. , Agricultural Science , 06/2014, Volume 2, Issue 4, Nigeria, p.13, (2014) , (Practical Publication)
Agrotourism development in Ghana: A study of its prospects and challenges at Adjeikrom Cocoa Tour Facility, Eshun, Gabriel, and Tettey Christopher , Bulletin of Geography. Socio–economic Series, 06/2014, Issue 25, Torun, Ploand, p.99, (2014) , (Practical Publication)
Cocoa agroforestry a bridge for sustainable organic cocoa Production, Nunoo, Isaac, and Owusu Victor , 4th ISOFAR Scientific Conference, 10/2014, Istanbul, Turkey, (2014) , (Practical Publication)
Cocoa Fertilizer Forum, World Cocoa Foundation, and Initiative IDH - sustaina , 10/2014, Copenhagen, (2014) , (Practical Publication)
Improving Productivity and Alleviating Poverty by Acknowledging the Role of Women - Poster presented at the WCC 2014, , World Cocoa Conference 2014, 06/2014, Amsterdam, (2014) , (Practical Publication)
Increasing Cocoa Quality by Acknowledging the role of Women - Poster presented at the WCC 2014, , World Cocoa Conference 2014, 06/2014, Amsterdam, (2014) , (Practical Publication)
An Assessment of Investment in Technology in Cocoa Processing Industry in Nigeria, , Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development , 05/2014, Volume 5, Issue 10, Akure, (2014) , (Practical Publication)

Organic chocolate for the Swiss market: Contract farming in the cocoa sector in Honduras

TitleOrganic chocolate for the Swiss market: Contract farming in the cocoa sector in Honduras
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsFromm, Ingrid
PublisherBern University of Applied Sciences
CityBern
Publication LanguageEnglish
KeywordsHonduras
Lead

When small scale farmers in developing countries secure contracts with large international buyers, they are protecting themselves against certain risks such as short term-price fluctuations and other market uncertainties. However there are certain conditions that must be met to keep all parties satisfied with the commercial relationship that has been established. There are several agricultural sectors where contract farming (CF) is less common, including the coffee and cocoa sector. Coffee and cocoa producers in developing countries have arms-length contact with intermediaries and there are few cases of CF for cocoa. this chapter presents the case of small-scale cocoa farmers in Honduras, who have been able to establish CF agreements and a solid commercial relationship with a Swiss buyer.
This example from the field gives a different view as to how farmers can secure a sustainable income from the relationship established between an international buyer, which procures directly from them, and other local actors. Partnerships between the cocoa producers, the private firm and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) go beyond a contract; it is in the mutual interest of all parties to achieve a common goal that keeps all stakeholders committed to the relationship. A decade ago, most cocoa producers weer abandoning their plantations because the prospects of a sustainable income from cocoa production were so grim. It has since become a reality for farmers to generate a reasonable livelihood from the income associated with cocoa production. he interaction among so many different actors in the sector, because of CF, was crucial in linking these farmers to a Swiss buyer.

URLhttp://www.fao.org/uploads/media/cf.pdf#page=140

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